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J Biol Chem. 2001 Jul 13;276(28):25813-22. Epub 2001 Apr 30.

The p53-regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21 (cip1, waf1, sdi1), is not required for global genomic and transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA photoproducts.

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1
Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Erratum in

  • J Biol Chem 2002 Jul 26;277(30):27575.

Abstract

The p53 tumor suppressor gene is a transcriptional activator involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. We have shown that p53 is required for efficient nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA photoproducts from global genomic DNA but has no effect on transcription-coupled repair. In order to evaluate whether p53 influences repair indirectly through cell cycle arrest following DNA damage or plays a direct role, we examined repair in vivo in human cells genetically altered to disrupt or regulate the function of p53 and p21. Both primary human fibroblasts and HCT116 colon carcinoma cells wild type for p53 but in which the p21 gene was inactivated through targeted homologous recombination showed no decrease in global repair of UV photoproducts. Human bladder carcinoma cells mutant for p53 and containing a tetracycline-regulated p21 cDNA showed no significant enhancement of repair upon induction of p21 expression. All of the cell lines, including the mismatch repair-deficient, MLH1 mutant HCT116 cells, were proficient for transcription-coupled repair. Clonogenic survival of HCT116 cells following UV irradiation showed no dependence on p21. Therefore, our results indicate that p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair does not require the function of the p21 gene product and is independent of p53-regulated cell cycle checkpoints.

PMID:
11331289
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M102240200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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