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Sleep. 2001 May 1;24(3):303-12.

Actigraphy and parental ratings of sleep in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Author information

  • 1Department of Education, School Psychology Program, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. penny.corkum@msvu.ca

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To assess various sleep parameters in latency-aged children with ADHD and their normally developing peers through the use of multiple sleep measures.

DESIGN:

Six sleep parameters were evaluated for two groups of children, ADHD and normal comparison. Each group consisted of 25 children (20 males, 5 females) who ranged in age from 7 to 11 years. All children underwent rigorous diagnostic procedures and the ADHD subjects were selected only if they displayed pervasiveness in their symptomatology and were medication naive. Parents completed a retrospective questionnaire which evaluated sleep problems over the past six months. Additionally, each child wore an actigraph for seven consecutive nights, and the child's parents completed a sleep diary during this time period.

SETTING:

N/A.

PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS:

N/A.

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

RESULTS:

Based on the findings from the questionnaire, parents of children with ADHD reported significantly more sleep problems than parents of normally developing children. However, the majority of these sleep differences were not verified through actigraphy or sleep diary data, with the exception of longer sleep duration for children with ADHD and parent reports that describe increased bedtime resistence. It was also found that child-parent interactions during bedtime routines were more challenging in the ADHD group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the possibility of intrinsic sleep problems such as longer sleep duration, results indicate that many of the sleep problems of children with ADHD may be due to challenging behaviours during bedtime routines. The reason for discrepancies among sleep studies employing objective measures as well as between retrospective and prospective measures are discussed.

PMID:
11322713
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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