Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabet Med. 2001 Mar;18(3):193-8.

Polynesians: prone to obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus but not hyperinsulinaemia.

Author information

1
Department of of Rural Health, University of Melbourne, Goulburn Valley Base Hospital, Victoria, Australia. d.simmons@medicine.unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

AIMS:

To compare the extent of hyperinsulinaemia among New Zealand Europeans and Polynesians (an ethnic group at high risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus).

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey from randomly selected households was conducted in inner urban South Auckland. Subjects were either European, Maori or Pacific Islands Polynesians aged 40-79 years and were screened for diabetes using a random blood glucose. Those with an elevated result, and 20% randomly selected from those with a normal screening result, were invited to a 75-g glucose tolerance test. WHO criteria (1998) for diabetes were used.

RESULTS:

In those aged 40-59 years, total prevalence of diabetes was 7.5 (6.2-9.0)% in Europeans but 21.1 (16.6-25.6)% among Maori and 25.0 (19.8-30.1)% among Pacific peoples; obesity (body mass index >or= 31.0 kg/m2) was present in 26% Europeans, 63% Maori and 69% Pacific peoples. Non-diabetic Polynesians were relatively hyperglycaemic and hyperinsulinaemic. After adjusting for the degree of obesity, Polynesians had similar insulin levels to Europeans.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings indicate that Polynesians are not intrinsically insulin resistant as a group, a prerequisite found in most other ethnic groups at high risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The high prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in Polynesians could be the result of their high prevalence of obesity.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center