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Xenobiotica. 2000 Oct;30(10):943-53.

Characterization of cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in drug oxidations in mouse intestinal microsomes.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kanazawa University, Japan.

Abstract

1. Cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) enzymes involved in drug oxidations in mouse intestines were characterized for their role in the first-pass metabolism of xenobiotics. 2. Preparation of mouse intestinal microsomes using a buffer containing glycerol and protease inhibitors including (p-amidinophenyl) methanesulphonyl fluoride, EDTA, soybean trypsin inhibitor, aprotinin, bestatin and leupeptine gave the highest testosterone 6beta-hydroxylase activity among several preparation buffers tested in this study. Testosterone 6beta-hydroxylase activity catalysed by mouse intestinal microsomes subjected to freezing and thawing was lower than that catalysed by unfrozen intestinal microsomes. 3. Low but significant catalytic activities of nifedipine oxidation, midazolam 1'- and 4-hydroxylation, chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation, bufuralol 1'- and 6-hydroxylations and tolbutamide methylhydroxylation were observed in mouse intestinal microsomes. Testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation, and bufuralol 1'- and 6-hydroxylations were inhibited by ketoconazole, diethyldithiocarbamate and quinine respectively. 4. Immunoblot analysis using anti-rat CYP3A antibodies demonstrated two immunoreactive bands showing similar migration in mouse intestinal and hepatic microsomes, although studies using anti-CYP1A, anti-CYP2C, anti-CYP2D and anti-CYP2E1 antibodies did not detect any band in mouse intestinal microsomes. 5. The results suggest that mouse intestinal microsomes should be prepared with glycerol and several protease inhibitors and that Cyp3a enzymes probably play an important role in drug oxidations catalysed by mouse intestine.

PMID:
11315103
DOI:
10.1080/00498250050200104
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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