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Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2001 Mar;13(3):219-25.

Irritable bowel syndrome: is the search for lactose intolerance justified?

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine if confirmation of hypolactasia offers any benefit to the dietary treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

METHODS:

One hundred and twenty-two consecutive IBS patients (37 male, 85 female) were given lactose hydrogen breath tests (LHBT). Those with positive LHBT followed a low lactose diet for 3 weeks. Those improving on the diet were given double-blind, placebo-controlled challenges (DBPCC) with 5 g, 10 g and 15 g of lactose and a placebo, to confirm lactose intolerance. Those who did not respond to the low lactose diet followed either an exclusion or low fibre diet. Symptoms scores were kept prior to the LHBT, 8 h post-LHBT and daily whilst following any dietary change. Patients with negative LHBT returned to clinic and subsequent dietary interventions were recorded.

RESULTS:

LHBT was positive in 33/122 (27%) IBS patients. Syrr otom scores prior to LHBT were not significantly different between the two groups, but after LHBT the symptoms in the positive group were significantly worse. Twenty-three patients followed a low-lactose diet of which only nine (39%) improved. Six who did not improve followed an exclusion diet, three improved and all were intolerant of milk. Three tried a low fibre diet with two improving. DBPCC were inconclusive. In the negative LHBT group 35 agreed to try a diet and 24 improved (69%). Eight were intolerant of cow's milk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Use of a low lactose diet was disappointing in IBS patients with lactose malabsorption. Food intolerance was demonstrated in IBS patients with positive or negative LHBT and milk was identified as a problem in both groups. DBPCC were inconclusive. There appears to be little advantage in trying to separate patients who malabsorb lactose from others with IBS.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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