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Psychosom Med. 2001 Mar-Apr;63(2):216-20.

Psychological factors and delayed healing in chronic wounds.

Author information

1
Wound Healing Research Centre, University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Studies have shown that stress can delay the healing of experimental punch biopsy wounds. This study examined the relationship between the healing of natural wounds and anxiety and depression.

METHODS:

Fifty-three subjects (31 women and 22 men) were studied. Wound healing was rated using a five-point Likert scale. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD), a well-validated psychometric questionnaire. Psychological and clinical wound assessments were each conducted with raters and subjects blinded to the results of the other assessment.

RESULTS:

Delayed healing was associated with a higher mean HAD score (p = .0348). Higher HAD anxiety and depression scores (indicating "caseness") were also associated with delayed healing (p = .0476 and p = .0311, respectively). Patients scoring in the top 50% of total HAD scores were four times more likely to have delayed healing than those scoring in the bottom 50% (confidence interval = 1.06-15.08).

CONCLUSIONS:

The relationship between healing of chronic wounds and anxiety and depression as measured by the HAD was statistically significant. Further research in the form of a longitudinal study and/or an interventional study is proposed.

PMID:
11292268
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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