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Am J Pathol. 2001 Apr;158(4):1517-24.

Inverse relationship between microsatellite instability and K-ras and p53 gene alterations in colon cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, 50 North Medical Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA. wsamowitz@msscc.med.utah.edu

Abstract

Some studies have shown an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability in colon cancer and mutations in p53 and K-ras, whereas others have not. We therefore evaluated these features in a population-based sample of 496 individuals with colon cancer. Microsatellite instability was determined by a panel of 10 tetranucleotide repeats, the Bethesda consensus panel of mono- and dinucleotide repeats, and coding mononucleotide repeats in transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, hMSH3, BAX, hMSH6, and insulin-like growth factor receptor type II. Mutations in codons 12 and 13 in K-ras were evaluated by sequencing. p53 overexpression (as detected by immunohistochemistry) was used as an indicator of p53 mutation; this was evaluated in 275 of the tumors. K-ras mutations were present in 33.2% of tumors, p53 overexpression in 51.5%, and microsatellite instability (as determined by the Bethesda consensus panel) in 12.5%. K-ras mutations were significantly less common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (11.8% versus 36.9%, P: < 0.001). p53 overexpression was significantly less common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (20.0% versus 55.7%, P: < 0.001). These inverse relationships between microsatellite instability and ras gene mutations and p53 overexpression were shown to be independent of tumor site in logistic regression analyses. All other measures of instability also showed statistically significant inverse relationships independent of tumor site with alterations in ras and p53, and instability results determined by the panel of 10 tetranucleotide repeats were highly significantly related to those determined by the Bethesda consensus panel. Coding mononucleotide repeat mutations were significantly more common in unstable tumors than stable tumors (85.7% versus 1.0%, P: < 0.001). We conclude that there is an inverse relationship between microsatellite instability and mutations in p53 and K-ras, and that the molecular profile of colon cancers with microsatellite instability is characterized by relatively infrequent mutations in K-ras and p53 and relatively frequent mutations in coding mononucleotide repeats.

PMID:
11290569
PMCID:
PMC1891913
DOI:
10.1016/S0002-9440(10)64102-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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