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Intensive Care Med. 2001 Jan;27(1):84-90.

Plasma glutamine depletion and patient outcome in acute ICU admissions.

Author information

1
Department of Intensive Care, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. h.m.oudemans-vanstraaten@olvg.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether low plasma glutamine (PG) is related to severity of illness, and actual and predicted hospital mortality.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

18-bed closed format general intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital.

PATIENTS:

Cohort of 80 seriously ill patients non-electively admitted to the ICU.

INTERVENTIONS:

Blood sampling for the determination of PG at ICU admission.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Severity of illness and predicted mortality were calculated using the locally validated APACHE II, SAPS II, and MPM II 0 and 24 systems. Illness scores, and actual and predicted hospital mortality were compared between patients with total PG < 0.420 mmol/l ("low PG") and patients with PG > or = 0.420 mmol/l. Mean total PG was 0.523 mmol/l, range 0.220-1.780 mmol/l. Low PG (n = 25) was associated with higher age (P = 0.03), shock as primary diagnosis, and higher actual hospital mortality (60 % vs 29 %, P = 0.01). Normal to high PG was associated with high plasma creatine phosphokinase (P = 0.007) There was a nonsignificant trend towards higher severity of illness scores and predicted mortality rates in the low PG group. The presence of low PG significantly improved mortality prediction when added as a factor to the APACHE II predicted mortality rate (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Low PG at acute ICU admission is related to higher age, shock as primary diagnosis, and higher hospital mortality. Low PG represents a risk of poor outcome, not fully reflected in the presently used mortality prediction systems.

PMID:
11280678
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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