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J Biol Chem. 2001 Apr 27;276(17):14308-14. Epub 2001 Feb 1.

Potent blockade of hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell motility, matrix invasion and branching morphogenesis by antagonists of Grb2 Src homology 2 domain interactions.

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1
Laboratories of Cellular and Molecular Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Basic Sciences, NCI, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-4255, USA.

Abstract

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulates mitogenesis, motogenesis, and morphogenesis in a wide range of cellular targets during development, homeostasis and tissue regeneration. Inappropriate HGF signaling occurs in several human cancers, and the ability of HGF to initiate a program of protease production, cell dissociation, and motility has been shown to promote cellular invasion and is strongly linked to tumor metastasis. Upon HGF binding, several tyrosines within the intracellular domain of its receptor, c-Met, become phosphorylated and mediate the binding of effector proteins, such as Grb2. Grb2 binding through its SH2 domain is thought to link c-Met with downstream mediators of cell proliferation, shape change, and motility. We analyzed the effects of Grb2 SH2 domain antagonists on HGF signaling and observed potent blockade of cell motility, matrix invasion, and branching morphogenesis, with ED(50) values of 30 nm or less, but only modest inhibition of mitogenesis. These compounds are 1000-10,000-fold more potent anti-motility agents than any previously characterized Grb2 SH2 domain antagonists. Our results suggest that SH2 domain-mediated c-Met-Grb2 interaction contributes primarily to the motogenic and morphogenic responses to HGF, and that these compounds may have therapeutic application as anti-metastatic agents for tumors where the HGF signaling pathway is active.

PMID:
11278639
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M010202200
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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