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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2001 Mar 30;1531(1-2):68-76.

The expression of PPAR-associated genes is modulated through postnatal development of PPAR subtypes in the small intestine.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Japan.

Abstract

In this study, we found that the mRNA level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha, but not of PPARdelta, was elevated in the jejunum during the postnatal development of the rat. Moreover, we found that the expressions of PPAR-dependent genes, such as acyl-CoA oxidase, L-FABP, and I-FABP, were also increased during the postnatal development of the small intestine. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that both the PPARalpha-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RXRalpha) heterodimer and the PPARdelta-RXRalpha heterodimer bound to the peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) of acyl-CoA oxidase and L-FABP genes. The binding of the PPARalpha-RXRalpha heterodimer to the PPREs of the various genes was enhanced by the addition of PPARalpha, with a concomitant reduction of the binding of PPARdelta-RXRalpha to the PPREs. Furthermore, the binding activity of PPARalpha-RXRalpha, but not PPARdelta-RXRalpha, to the PPREs was enhanced by the addition of a PPAR ligand, WY14,643. The GAL4-PPAR-chimera reporter assay showed that WY14,643 transactivated the reporter gene through action of PPARalpha, but not through PPARdelta, in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, oral administration of a PPAR ligand, clofibrate, during 3 consecutive days of the weanling period caused a parallel increase in the mRNA levels of these PPAR-dependent genes. These results suggest that acyl-CoA oxidase, L-FABP and the other PPAR-dependent genes in the small intestine may be coordinately modulated during postnatal development by the disproportional expression of PPARalpha over PPARdelta.

PMID:
11278173
DOI:
10.1016/s0167-4889(01)00071-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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