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Pediatr Neurol. 2001 Feb;24(2):129-34.

Long-term sleep disturbances in adolescents after minor head injury.

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1
Sleep Laboratory; Rambam Medical Center and Technion--IIT, Haifa, Israel.

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that patients in the acute phase after minor head injury (MHI) complain of sleep disturbances. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the long-term effects of MHI on sleep in adolescents. Nineteen adolescents who had suffered MHI 3 years before the study and had complained of sleep disturbances completed a sleep questionnaire and were investigated in the sleep laboratory by whole-night polysomnographic recordings and were actigraphically monitored for 5 days at home. Questionnaire results revealed severe complaints regarding sleep behavior. Polysomnographic recordings revealed that in comparison with controls, MHI was associated with lower sleep efficiency (79.8 +/- [9.8]% vs 87.7 +/- [6.8]%; P < 0.005), with more wake time (10.6 +/- [9.0]% vs 3.4 +/- [4.4]%; P < 0.005), and with more awakenings lasting more than 3 minutes (2.1 +/- [1.5] vs 0.6 +/- [0.8]; P < 0.005). These findings were confirmed by actigraphic monitoring that revealed lower sleep efficiency (90 +/- [5]% vs 94 +/- [3]%; P < 0.05), more minutes of wake time (49 +/- [21] min vs 28 +/- [15] min; P < 0.05), and a trend toward more awakenings longer than 5 minutes (1.8 +/- [0.8] vs 1.2 +/- [0.8]; P = 0.063). Our data demonstrated that 3 years after MHI without any discernible clinical sequel, adolescents still complain of sleep disturbances that could be confirmed by both polysomnographic and actigraphic monitoring.

PMID:
11275462
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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