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Photochem Photobiol. 2001 Feb;73(2):170-7.

Activation of the IL-10 gene promoter following photodynamic therapy of murine keratinocytes.

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1
PDT Center, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton St., Buffalo, NY 14263, USA. sandra.gollnick@roswellpark.org

Abstract

Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an anticancer treatment modality, has recently been shown to be an effective treatment for several autoimmune disease models including antigen-induced arthritis. PDT was found to induce the expression of IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in the skin, and this expression has similar kinetics to the appearance of PDT-induced suppression of skin-mediated immune responses such as the contract hypersensitivity (CHS) response. Some aspects of the UVB-induced suppression of the immune response have been linked to the induction of IL-10. IL-10 has been shown to inhibit the development and activation of Th1 cells, which are critical for many cell-mediated immune responses, including CHS. We have examined the effect of PDT and UVB irradiation on the activity of the IL-10 gene promoter and on IL-10 mRNA stability using the murine keratinocyte line, PAM 212. In vitro PDT induces IL-10 mRNA and protein expression from PAM 212 cells, which can be correlated with an increase in AP-1 DNA binding activity and activation of the IL-10 gene promoter by PDT. Deletion of an AP-1 response element from the IL-10 gene promoter was shown to abrogate the PDT-induced promoter activity indicating that the AP-1 response element is critical to IL-10 induction by PDT. In addition, PDT results in an increase in IL-10 mRNA stability, which may also contribute to the increased IL-10 expression in PAM 212 cells following PDT. In vitro UVB irradiation also results in activation of the IL-10 promoter. However, in contrast to PDT, UVB-induced activation of the IL-10 promoter is not AP-1 dependent and did not increase IL-10 mRNA stability.

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