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Med J Aust. 2001 Feb 5;174(3):130-6.

What are appropriate rates of invasive procedures following acute myocardial infarction? A systematic review.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. ian_scott@health.qld.gov.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the evidence that higher rates of coronary angiography (CA) and revascularisation (RV) in the subacute phase of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) improve patient outcomes.

DATA SOURCES:

MEDLINE 1990 - December 1999, Current Contents 1990-1999, Cochrane Library (Issue 4, 1999), HealthSTAR 1990-1999, selected websites and bibliographies of retrieved articles.

STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION:

Studies selected were (1) randomised trials comparing outcomes of "invasive" versus "conservative" use of CA and RV following AMI; (2) observational studies with formal methods comparing outcomes of high versus low rates of use of these procedures; and (3) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), expert panel statements and decision analyses which met critical appraisal criteria, and which specified procedural indications. Outcome measures were rates of mortality, re-infarction and limiting or unstable angina.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

56 articles were identified; 24 met inclusion criteria. Pooled data from nine RCTs of "invasive" (CA rate 96%; RV rate 66%) versus "conservative" (CA rate 28%; RV rate 19%) strategies showed no significant differences in mortality or re-infarction rates. Pooled results from 12 observational studies showed no mortality differences, but an excess reinfarction rate (8.0% vs 6.4%; P<0.001) in high- versus low-rate populations. Evidence of survival benefit from procedural intervention was strongest for patients with recurrent ischaemia combined with left ventricular dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the subacute phase of AMI, rates of CA and RV in excess of 30% and 20%, respectively, may not confer additional benefit in preventing death or re-infarction. However, variability between studies in design, patient selection, and extent of cross-over from medical to procedural groups, as well as limited data on symptom status, limits generalisability of results.

PMID:
11247616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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