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Meeting energy budgets by modulation of behaviour and physiology in the eel (Anguilla anguilla L.).

Author information

1
School of Biological Sciences, Hatherly Laboratories, University of Exeter, Prince of Wales Road, EX4 4PS, Exeter, UK. s.f.owen@ex.ac.uk

Abstract

Availability of energy for feeding, and the scope to accommodate the associated increase in oxygen demand (SDA: specific dynamic action) can, to a large degree, regulate the future feeding and energy availability of an animal. There is a fundamental conflict between locomotion and SDA within the physiological capacity of a mobile organism to respire sufficiently in order to simultaneously meet both requirements. This paper is a first attempt to integrate the costs of behaviour and physiology and produce a testable model of energy allocation in the eel. Total oxygen consumption (metabolic rate MO2) of the eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) was 109 micromol O2 x g(-1) x day(-1) with a cost of measured protein synthesis representing 49% of this value, and measured routine swimming (locomotor) activity representing approximately 34%. By allocating periods of reduced activity, the eel is able to develop a strategy to prudently meet the costs of feeding and temporally balance energy budgets (in terms of oxygen) by modulation of the behaviour and demands of physiology.

PMID:
11246050
DOI:
10.1016/s1095-6433(00)00340-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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