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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Feb;82(2):167-73.

Functional magnetic stimulation of the colon in persons with spinal cord injury.

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1
Functional Magnetic Stimulation Laboratory, Spinal Cord Injury/Disorder Health Care Group, VA Long Beach Health Care System, Long Beach, CA 9022, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the usefulness of functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) as a noninvasive method to stimulate the colon in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).

DESIGN:

A prospective before-after trial consisting of 2 protocols.

SETTING:

FMS laboratories of 2 SCI centers.

PARTICIPANTS:

Two able-bodied men and 13 men with SCI levels ranging from C3 to L1. Protocol 1 consisted of 9 subjects, 2 of whom were excluded from the analysis. Protocol 2 consisted of 4 subjects.

INTERVENTION:

Commercially available magnetic stimulators with round magnetic coils (MCs) were used. Protocol 1 measured the effects of FMS on rectal pressure by placing the MC on the transabdominal and lumbosacral regions. Protocol 2 consisted of a 5-week stimulation period to investigate the effects of FMS on total and segmental colonic transit times (CTTs).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

An increase in rectal pressure and a decrease in CTT by magnetic stimulation.

RESULTS:

Data were averaged and the standard error of the mean was calculated. Statistically significant changes in rectal pressure and CTT were also measured. Rectal pressures increased from 26.7 +/- 7.44cmH(2)O to 48.0 +/- 9.91cmH(2)O, p =.0037, with lumbosacral stimulation, and from 30.0 +/- 6.35cmH(2)O to 42.7 +/- 7.95cmH(2)O, p =.0015, with transabdominal stimulation. With FMS, the mean CTT decreased from 105.2 to 89.4 hours, p =.02.

CONCLUSION:

FMS is able to stimulate the colon and reduce CTT. FMS is a noninvasive, technological advancement for managing neurogenic bowel in patients with SCI.

PMID:
11239306
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2001.18215
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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