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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2001 Jan;82(1):49-56.

Levels of self-awareness after acute brain injury: how patients' and rehabilitation specialists' perceptions compare.

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1
Transitional Learning Center, Galveston, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine self-awareness regarding performance on 4 daily living tasks and to test theoretical predictions for a model of self-awareness in persons with acquired brain injury.

DESIGN:

A comparative design examining the level of self-awareness recorded by patients and actual patient performance as judged by rehabilitation clinicians.

SETTING:

A community-based residential center providing comprehensive rehabilitation services to persons with acquired brain injury.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifty-five persons with acquired brain injury and the identified potential to return to independent function in the community. Ten subjects without brain injury provided comparison data.

INTERVENTION:

Information was collected by using patient self-report, clinician rating of patient performance, patient rating of non-brain-injured subjects, and clinician rating of non-brain-injured subjects.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Three self-awareness criteria were examined: intellectual, emergent, and anticipatory. Self-awareness was rated for 3 tasks: dressing, meal planning, and money management.

RESULTS:

Statistically significant differences (p <.05) were found for all levels of self-awareness across the 3 tasks. Persons with brain injury judged their abilities higher than clinician ratings of actual performance. No statistical support was found for a hierarchy among intellectual, emergent, and anticipatory self-awareness.

CONCLUSIONS:

No evidence was found supporting a hierarchy among levels of self-awareness as defined and measured in the present study. New methods for operationally defining intellectual, emergent, and anticipatory self-awareness are necessary to examine the relationship between self-awareness and performance.

PMID:
11239286
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2001.9167
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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