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Am J Public Health. 2001 Mar;91(3):432-6.

Sudden infant death syndrome, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 109 Observatory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA. haroldp@sph.umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study analyzed the relationship between prenatal maternal smoking and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and examined the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions.

METHODS:

All recorded US singleton SIDS deaths from the 1995 birth cohort with birthweight exceeding 500 g were investigated. Infants with available maternal smoking data were matched with controls who survived to 1 year. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate SIDS risks and accompanying cost-effectiveness.

RESULTS:

A total of 23.6% of singleton SIDS deaths appear to be attributable to prenatal maternal smoking. Typical cessation services available to all pregnant smokers could avert 108 SIDS deaths annually, at an estimated cost of $210,500 per life saved.

CONCLUSIONS:

Typical prenatal smoking cessation programs are highly cost-effective but have limited impact on the population incidence of SIDS.

PMID:
11236409
PMCID:
PMC1446585
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.91.3.432
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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