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Arch Ophthalmol. 2001 Mar;119(3):334-6.

Increased corneal thickness in patients with ocular hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. herman.david@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Central corneal thickness greater than 0.520 mm causes true intraocular pressure to be overestimated when the technique of applanation tonometry is used to measure intraocular pressure.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the corneal thickness measurements of patients enrolled in a study of ocular hypertension with those of age-matched control subjects with normal intraocular pressure.

METHODS:

Central corneal pachymetry using an optical pachymeter was performed on each study subject (n = 55) at baseline and in an independent sample of control subjects. A 2 sample, 2-tailed T test was used to compare the 2 populations.

RESULTS:

The patients with ocular hypertension had significantly higher mean corneal thickness measurements (mean +/- SD, 0.594 +/- 0.037 mm) than the control group (0.563 +/- 0.027 mm) (P<.001).

CONCLUSION:

Corneal thickness may be a confounding factor in the measurement of intraocular pressure, and this may modify the risk for progression to glaucoma in patients with ocular hypertension.

PMID:
11231765
DOI:
10.1001/archopht.119.3.334
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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