Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurotrauma. 2001 Feb;18(2):141-62.

Age-dependency of 45calcium accumulation following lateral fluid percussion: acute and delayed patterns.

Author information

1
Department of Physiological Science, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024-7039, USA. costeen@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

This study was designed to determine the regional and temporal profile of 45calcium (45Ca2+) accumulation following mild lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury and how this profile differs when traumatic brain injury occurs early in life. Thirty-six postnatal day (P) 17, thirty-four P28, and 17 adult rats were subjected to a mild (approximately 2.75 atm) LFP or sham injury and processed for 45Ca2+ autoradiography immediately, 6 h, and 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 days after injury. Optical densities were measured bilaterally within 16 regions of interest. 45Ca2+ accumulation was evident diffusely within the ipsilateral cerebral cortex immediately after injury (18-64% increase) in all ages, returning to sham levels by 2-4 days in P17s, 1 day in P28s, and 4 days in adults. While P17s showed no further 45Ca2+ accumulation, P28 and adult rats showed an additional delayed, focal accumulation in the ipsilateral thalamus beginning 2-4 days postinjury (12-49% increase) and progressing out to 14 days (26-64% increase). Histological analysis of cresyl violet-stained, fresh frozen tissue indicated little evidence of neuronal loss acutely (in all ages), but considerable delayed cell death in the ipsilateral thalamus of the P28 and adult animals. These data suggest that two temporal patterns of 45Ca2+ accumulation exist following LFP: acute, diffuse calcium flux associated with the injury-induced ionic cascade and blood brain barrier breakdown and delayed, focal calcium accumulation associated with secondary cell death. The age-dependency of posttraumatic 45Ca2+ accumulation may be attributed to differential biomechanical consequences of the LFP injury and/or the presence or lack of secondary cell death.

PMID:
11229708
DOI:
10.1089/08977150150502587
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center