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Teach Learn Med. 2000 Spring;12(2):91-5.

Clinicians and computers: friends or foes?

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1
University of Adelaide Medical School, Adelaide, South Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Computer-aided learning is accepted by students as a learning resource, but the views of the teaching community are largely unknown.

PURPOSE:

To document clinicians' experience with computers and to record their attitudes toward computer usage in clinical practice and student education.

METHODS:

Questionnaire mailed out to all clinicians, including interns and residents, fellows, and attending physicians in 3 major teaching hospitals in South Australia, with a total of 646 clinical staff.

RESULTS:

Replies were received from 246 staff. Eighty percent of clinicians had at least 2 years of experience with computers and used computers for at least 2 hr each week. Despite this, there was an obvious lack of conviction among clinicians that computer-aided learning was of use in student education and assessment. This may reflect their lack of experience with this medium as an educational tool.

CONCLUSIONS:

If computer-aided learning is to make any significant impact on medical student education, it must be carefully and objectively evaluated, and its benefit must be clearly demonstrated to clinical teachers.

PMID:
11228684
DOI:
10.1207/S15328015TLM1202_6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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