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Obes Res. 2000 Dec;8(9):638-45.

On the relation of attempting to lose weight, restraint, and binge eating in outpatients with binge eating disorder.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520-8038, USA. Robin.Masheb@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship among attempts to lose weight, restraint, and eating behavior in outpatients with binge eating disorder (BED).

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Participants were 93 consecutive outpatients evaluated for a clinical trial who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fourth edition criteria for BED. The Eating Disorder Examination Interview was administered to assess attempts at weight loss, restraint, different forms of overeating, and the attitudinal psychopathology of eating disorders (i.e., concerns regarding eating, shape, and weight). In addition, the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire was used to assess cognitive restraint, hunger, and disinhibition. Psychometrically established measures were given to assess body dissatisfaction, depression, and self-esteem.

RESULTS:

The majority of participants (75.3%; N = 70) reported attempting to lose weight, but only 37.6% (N = 35) reported dietary restraint on at least half the days of the month. Dietary restraint and cognitive restraint were not associated with any form of binge eating or overeating. Dietary restraint and cognitive restraint were positively correlated with weight concern, shape concern, and body dissatisfaction, and negatively correlated with body mass index. To further examine the interplay between attempting to lose weight and restraint, three study groups were created: unrestrained nonattempters (21.5%, N = 20), unrestrained attempters (40.9%; N = 38), and restrained attempters (34.4%; N = 32). The three groups did not differ significantly on binge eating or other eating behaviors; however, significant differences were observed for weight concern, shape concern, and body dissatisfaction.

DISCUSSION:

Attempts to lose weight and restraint are not synonymous for patients with BED. Although 75.3% of BED patients reported that they were attempting to lose weight, only 37.6% reported dietary restraint on at least half the days of the previous month. While restraint was negatively associated with body mass index, it was not related to binge eating or overeating. Our findings raise questions about prevailing models that posit restraint as a predominant factor in the maintenance of binge eating in BED.

PMID:
11225712
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2000.82
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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