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Diabetes Obes Metab. 1999 Sep;1(5):281-4.

Intracerebroventricularly administered corticotropin-releasing factor inhibits food intake and produces anxiety-like behaviour at very low doses in mice.

Author information

1
Metabolic Disease Research, Pharmacology Laboratories, Institute for Drug Discovery Research, Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd, Tsukuba, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

Previous studies have demonstrated that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) produces behavioural, physiological and immunological responses similar to those induced by stress. However, these findings have been validated largely in laboratory rats.

METHODS:

We examined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CRF on anxiety and food intake in mice. Using the elevated-plus maze, we measured anxiety levels after i.c.v. CRF in mice. We also measured food intake for 2 h after i.c.v. CRF.

RESULTS:

CRF increased the normal preference for the closed arms of the maze at a very low dose of 3 pmol, indicating an anxiogenic effect. CRF powerfully suppressed food intake at the doses of 3-300 pmol for over 2 h.

CONCLUSION:

Our results demonstrate that i.c.v. CRF evokes anxiogenic behaviour and suppresses feeding with the same dose-response relationships in mice. CRF may thus play a role in integrating the overall responses to stress through co-ordinated actions in the brain of this species.

PMID:
11225639
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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