Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
BJOG. 2001 Jan;108(1):56-60.

Venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and the puerperium: incidence and additional risk factors from a London perinatal database.

Author information

  • 1Postgraduate Medical School, Guildford, Surrey, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the incidence of venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and the puerperium and to identify risk factors for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism.

DESIGN:

Cohort study and case-control study.

SETTING:

London, UK.

POPULATION:

395,335 women with live births or pregnancies of 24 or more weeks of gestation between 1988 and 1997.

METHODS:

Data extraction from the St Mary's Maternity Information System database. Random sample of 5% for case-control study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Incidence of venous thromboembolism; odds ratios for variables associated with venous thromboembolism.

RESULTS:

The incidence of venous thromboembolism was 85/100,000 maternities. There were approximately twice as many postpartum as antepartum events. Blood group A, multiple pregnancy, caesarean section, cardiac disease, delivery at gestational age of < 36 weeks, a body mass index of > or = 25, or more and maternal age of 35 or over were all found to increase incidence of venous thromboembolism.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although venous thromboembolism is the leading cause of maternal deaths in the UK, it is still a rare event. Most of these events are deep vein thromboses occurring in the postpartum period. Antenatally multiple birth is an important risk factor. Postnatally women who have had a caesarean section, premature delivery or history of cardiac disease should be assessed carefully for venous thromboembolism.

PMID:
11213005
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center