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Am J Public Health. 2001 Feb;91(2):213-8.

Ten-year changes in smoking among young adults: are racial differences explained by socioeconomic factors in the CARDIA study?

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1717 11th Ave S, MT 700, Birmingham, AL 35205-4785, USA. ckiefe@uab.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated whether socioeconomic factors explain racial/ethnic differences in regular smoking initiation and cessation.

METHODS:

Data were derived from the CARDIA study, a cohort of 5115 healthy adults aged 18 to 30 years at baseline (1985-1986) and recruited from the populations of 4 US cities. Respondents were followed over 10 years.

RESULTS:

Among 3950 respondents reexamined in 1995-1996, 20% of Whites and 33% of African Americans were smokers, as compared with 25% and 32%, respectively, in 1985-1986. On average, African Americans were of lower socioeconomic status. Ten-year regular smoking initiation rates for African American women, White women, African American men, and White men were 7.1%, 3.5%, 13.2%, and 5.1%, respectively, and the corresponding cessation rates were 25%, 35.1%, 19.2%, and 31.3%. After adjustment for socioeconomic factors, most 95% confidence intervals of the odds ratios for regular smoking initiation and cessation in African Americans vs Whites included 1.

CONCLUSIONS:

Less beneficial 10-year changes in smoking were observed in African Americans, but socioeconomic factors explained most of the racial disparity.

PMID:
11211629
PMCID:
PMC1446547
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.91.2.213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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