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Teacher reports of DSM-IV ADHD, ODD, and CD symptoms in schoolchildren.

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1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, State University of New York, Stony Brook, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the prevalence of DSM-IV symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder and age, gender, and comorbidity differences between ADHD subtypes.

METHOD:

Teachers completed a DSM-IV-referenced symptom inventory for 3,006 schoolchildren aged between 3 and 18 years.

RESULTS:

The screening prevalence rate of ADHD behaviors was 15.8%; rates for individual subtypes were 9.9% for inattentive, 2.4% for hyperactive-impulsive, and 3.6% for combined. The inattentive type was relatively uncommon in preschool children (3.9%), whereas the hyperactive-impulsive type was least common in teenagers (0.8%). Screening prevalence rates were higher for African-American (39.5%) than white (14.2%) students, but did not vary significantly (p < .05) as a function of geographic region or socioeconomic status. ADHD subtypes were rated as more impaired than the non-ADHD group on most measures and were easily differentiated on the basis of comorbid symptoms, social skills impairment, and special education services.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of this and similar studies show relatively high convergence for the prevalence of ADHD behaviors and differences between ADHD subtypes.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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