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Acute changes in the response to peripheral leptin with alteration in the diet composition.

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1
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA. linl@pbrc.edu

Abstract

Dietary induced obesity in rodents is associated with a resistance to leptin. We have investigated the hypothesis that dietary fat per se alters the feeding response to peripheral leptin in rats that were fed either their habitual high- or low-fat diet or were naively exposed to the alternative diet. Osborne-Mendel rats were adapted to either high- or low-fat diet. Food-deprived rats were given either leptin (0.5 mg/kg body wt ip) or saline, after which they were provided with either their familiar diet or the alternative diet. Food intake of rats adapted and tested with the low-fat diet was reduced 4 h after leptin injection, whereas rats adapted and tested with a high-fat diet did not respond to leptin. Leptin was injected again 1 and 5 days after the high-fat diet-adapted rats were switched to the low-fat diet. Leptin reduced the food intake on both days. In contrast, when low-fat diet-adapted rats were switched to a high-fat diet, the leptin inhibitory response was present on day 1 but not observed on day 5. Peripheral injection of leptin increased serum corticosterone level and decreased hypothalamic neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in rats fed the low-fat but not the high-fat diet for 20 days. The data suggest that dietary fat itself, rather than obesity, may induce leptin resistance within a short time of exposure to a high-fat diet.

PMID:
11208581
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.2001.280.2.R504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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