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Endod Dent Traumatol. 2000 Jun;16(3):122-7.

Traumatic dental injuries and Alpine skiing.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Preventive and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Innsbruck, Austria. maxillofaziale-Chirurgie@uibk.ac.at

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence and type of traumatic dental injuries after maxillofacial injuries as a result of Alpine skiing. During an 8-year period (from January 1991 to December 1998) 7600 patients with facial injuries were registered at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Innsbruck, Austria. Of 784 patients with skiing-related facial injuries (524 males, 260 females) 326 (41.6%) sustained injuries to 639 teeth. The age groups predominantly affected were between 7 and 32 years. Luxation injuries occurred in 338 (53%) teeth, fractures accounted for 270 tooth injuries (42%), and only 35 (5%) were lost at the place of the accident. Of skiers with traumatic dental injuries 58% had concomitant soft tissue injuries, while 23.3% had associated facial bone fractures. The most common causes of injury were falls in 42% (329 patients) and collisions with other persons in 24.1% (189 patients). Being hit by one's own sports equipment (11%) was the third most common cause. Collisions with obstacles accounted for 9% and lift accidents for 5.6% of injuries. The probability of suffering dentoalveolar trauma during skiing varied depending on the injury mechanism. There was a 2-fold risk for dentoalveolar trauma when colliding with objects, a 3.5-fold risk when hit by one's own equipment and a 8.5-fold risk during lift accidents. Dental injuries occurred in about 2% of all injured skiers. Dental health professionals should be aware of the high incidence and the distribution of dental trauma and facial injuries caused by skiing.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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