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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2001 Jan;22(1):10-2.

Nosocomial transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from an extrapulmonary site.

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1
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the extent of nosocomial transmission and risk factors associated with tuberculin skin test (TST) conversions among healthcare workers (HCWs) exposed to a patient with genitourinary Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study of exposed HCWs.

SETTING:

A 275-bed community hospital in Middle Tennessee.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 128 exposed HCWs and the index patient, who required drainage of a prostatic abscess and bilateral orchiectomy and expired after a 27-day hospitalization. Disseminated tuberculosis was diagnosed at autopsy.

METHODS:

Contact tracing was performed on exposed HCWs. Logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors associated with TST conversion.

RESULTS:

A total of 128 HCWs were exposed to the index patient. There was no evidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis throughout the patient's hospitalization; TST conversions occurred only among HCWs who were exposed to the patient during or after his surgical procedures. A total of 12 (13%) of 95 exposed HCWs who were previously nonreactive had newly positive TST: 6 of 28 nurses, 3 of 3 autopsy personnel, 2 of 17 respiratory therapists, and 1 of 12 surgical staff. By logistic regression, irrigation or packing of the surgical site was the only independent risk factor associated with TST conversion among nurses (odds ratio, 9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-67; P=.03).

CONCLUSION:

Manipulation of infected tissues of the genitourinary tract can result in nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis.

PMID:
11198015
DOI:
10.1086/501817
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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