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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2001 Jan 15;218(2):217-21.

Long-term outcome of gonadectomy performed at an early age or traditional age in dogs.

Author information

1
Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station 77843-4474, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine long-term results and complications of gonadectomy performed at an early age (prepubertal) or at the traditional age in dogs.

DESIGN:

Cohort study.

ANIMALS:

269 dogs from animal shelters.

PROCEDURE:

Dogs that underwent gonadectomy were allotted to 2 groups on the basis of estimated age at surgery (traditional age, > or =24 weeks old; prepubertal, < 24 weeks old). Adoptive owner information was obtained from shelter records, and telephone interviews were conducted with owners to determine physical or behavioral problems observed in the dogs since adoption. Follow-up information was obtained from attending veterinarians for dogs with complex problems or when owners were uncertain regarding the exact nature of their dog's problem.

RESULTS:

Prepubertal gonadectomy did not result in an increased incidence of behavioral problems or problems associated with any body system, compared with traditional-age gonadectomy, during a median follow-up period of 48 months after gonadectomy. Rate of retention in the original adoptive household was the same for dogs that underwent prepubertal gonadectomy as those that underwent traditional-age gonadectomy. Infectious diseases, however, were more common in dogs that underwent prepubertal gonadectomy.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

With the exception of infectious diseases, prepubertal gonadectomy may be safely performed in dogs without concern for increased incidence of physical or behavioral problems during at least a 4-year period after gonadectomy.

PMID:
11195826
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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