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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Feb;163(2):335-8.

Outcomes of intensive care unit care in adults with cystic fibrosis.

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1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7020, USA. namitas@med.unc.edu

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) causes progressive respiratory failure and death in more than 90% of patients. Mechanical ventilation has been discouraged in CF because of poor outcomes, but improved survival and the availability of lung transplantation have increased the indications for care of CF patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). We studied the outcomes of all CF patients admitted to the University of North Carolina Hospitals Medical ICU from January 1990 through December 1998. Seventy-six patients, ranging in ages from 17 to 45 yr (mean: 27 yr), and of whom 53% were female, had 136 admissions for exacerbations of CF with respiratory failure (RF, n = 65), hemoptysis (n = 33), antibiotic desensitization (n = 30), pneumothorax (n = 3), or other reasons (n = 5). Eighty-six percent of the patients with hemoptysis and all of those with desensitization and pneumothorax were alive 1 yr after ICU discharge. Of the 42 patients with RF, 37 (88%) required assisted ventilation. Twenty-three (55%) of the patients with RF survived to ICU discharge and 19 (45%) died. Seventeen (40%) of the patients with RF received lung transplants and 14 were alive 1 yr later. Without transplantation, three (7%) of the patients with RF were alive and three (7%) were dead 1 yr later. Sex, body mass index, and respiratory bacteria did not correlate with survival. We conclude that ICU care for adults with CF who have reversible complications is appropriate and effective. Ventilatory support is appropriate for some transplant candidates.

Comment in

PMID:
11179102
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.163.2.2003076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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