Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Intern Med. 2001 Jan 16;134(2):115-9.

Tropheryma whippelii DNA is rare in the intestinal mucosa of patients without other evidence of Whipple disease.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System 154T, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the pathogenesis of Whipple disease, the reservoirs of Tropheryma whippelii, and the proportion of persons harboring the bacterium without "classic" intestinal abnormalities.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the presence of T. whippelii in patients undergoing upper endoscopy for a variety of indications.

DESIGN:

Prospective and routine diagnostic examination of patients.

SETTING:

Three academic medical centers in California; Minnesota; and Heidelberg, Germany.

PATIENTS:

342 patients undergoing endoscopy for evaluation of dyspepsia or possible peptic ulcer (group A, 173 patients), malabsorption (group B, 37 patients), or clinical suspicion of Whipple disease (group C, 132 patients).

MEASUREMENTS:

Small-intestinal biopsy specimens were tested by polymerase chain reaction for T. whippelii DNA and examined for histopathologic abnormalities.

RESULTS:

All patients with negative histologic findings also had negative results for T. whippelii DNA.

CONCLUSIONS:

T. whippelii occurs only rarely in intestinal mucosa that lacks histopathologic evidence of Whipple disease. The human small intestinal mucosa is an unlikely reservoir for this organism.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center