Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Hum Pathol. 2001 Jan;32(1):113-8.

Estrogen receptor beta expression in invasive breast cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Baylor College of Medicine, and The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Abstract

The aim of this work was to determine the extent of estrogen receptor beta (ER-beta) expression in invasive breast cancer (BrCA) and whether ER-beta expression is correlated with response to adjuvant hormonal therapy with tamoxifen (AHTT). Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) for estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) and ER-beta was performed on sections of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue from 47 unselected invasive breast carcinomas (BrCA). IHC for ER-beta was also performed on sections of BrCA from 118 women who were treated with mastectomy and AHTT. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Of the 47 unselected BrCA, 17 (36%) were negative for ER-alpha and of these, 8 (47% of ER-alpha negative cases and 17% of all 47 patients) were ER-beta positive. Five of the 8 ER-alpha negative and ER-beta positive cases were positive for ER biochemically. There was no correlation between ER-beta positivity and overall survival in the unselected group. By contrast, in the group of women treated with AHTT, expression of ER-beta in more than 10% of cancer cells was associated with better survival (P = .0077), even in women with node-negative BrCA (P = .0069). In conclusion, our results show that a significant number of women with BrCA are positive for ER-beta only, and may be determined to be ER-negative when currently available IHC is used. ER-beta status is a significant predictor of response to AHTT in women with BrCA. Larger studies with multivariate analysis are needed to confirm these findings.

PMID:
11172304
DOI:
10.1053/hupa.2001.21506
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center