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Allergy. 2001 Feb;56(2):126-31.

Recruitment of CD1a+ Langerhans cells to the nasal mucosa in seasonal allergic rhinitis and effects of topical corticosteroid therapy.

Author information

1
Upper Respiratory Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute of Medicine at the National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Local antigen presentation may be necessary for both primary and recall T-cell responses to grass pollen in hay fever patients. We examined the effect of seasonal allergen exposure on nasal mucosal antigen-presenting cell (APC) populations and the effects of topical corticosteroid therapy.

METHODS:

Nasal biopsies were collected from 46 grass pollen-sensitive seasonal rhinitis patients before the grass-pollen season. A second biopsy was collected during the pollen season, when patients had received 6 weeks' treatment with either fluticasone propionate (200 microg, twice daily) or placebo. Cell populations in biopsy sections were quantified by immunocytochemistry.

RESULTS:

Significant increases in submucosal and epithelial CD1a+ Langerhans cells, but not CD68 + macrophages or CD20 + B cells, were observed during the pollen season. Seasonal increases in CD1a+ Langerhans cells were inhibited by corticosteroid therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Recruitment of CD1a+ Langerhans cells to the nasal mucosa during natural seasonal allergen exposure may contribute to local T cell responses. Topical corticosteroids may act, at least in part, by inhibiting effective allergen presentation to T cells through inhibition of recruitment of Langerhans cells to the nasal mucosa.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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