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Free Radic Biol Med. 2001 Feb 1;30(3):232-7.

Pyridoxine and pyridoxamine inhibits superoxide radicals and prevents lipid peroxidation, protein glycosylation, and (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity reduction in high glucose-treated human erythrocytes.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA. sjain@lsuhsc.edu

Abstract

Vitamin B(6) (pyridoxine) supplementation has been found beneficial in preventing diabetic neuropathy and retinopathy, and the glycosylation of proteins. Oxygen radicals and oxidative damage have been implicated in the cellular dysfunction and complications of diabetes. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that pyridoxine (P) and pyridoxamine (PM) inhibit superoxide radical production, reduce lipid peroxidation and glycosylation, and increase the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity in high glucose-exposed red blood cells (RBC). Superoxide radical production was assessed by the reduction of cytochrome C by glucose in the presence and absence of P or PM in a cell-free buffered solution. To examine cellular effects, washed normal human RBC were treated with control and high glucose concentrations with and without P or PM. Both P and PM significantly lowered lipid peroxidation and glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1)) formation in high glucose-exposed RBC. P and PM significantly prevented the reduction in (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity in high glucose-treated RBC. Thus, P or PM can inhibit oxygen radical production, which in turn prevents the lipid peroxidation, protein glycosylation, and (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity reduction induced by the hyperglycemia. This study describes a new biochemical mechanism by which P or PM supplementation may delay or inhibit the development of complications in diabetes.

PMID:
11165869
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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