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Transplantation. 2000 Dec 27;70(12):1713-7.

Continent urinary diversion in preparation for renal transplantation: a staged approach.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Julius Maximilians University Medical School, Würzburg, Germany. hubertus.riedmiller@mail.uni-wuerzburg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We prospectively assessed the safety of kidney transplantation into continent urinary intestinal reservoirs as a planned two-stage procedure in patients with absent or dysfunctional lower urinary tract.

METHODS:

Between November 1990 and June 1999, 12 patients have undergone renal transplantation into continent urinary reservoirs, and a further patient with a diversion is awaiting transplantation. This was part of a larger series of 356 patients who had undergone continent diversions during that period. A further 174 patients (33%) had diversions into ileal conduits.

FINDINGS:

Within a mean follow-up of 26.1 months (5-72) after transplantation renal function was stable with serum creatinine values ranging from 0.9 to 1.8 mg/dl. There were 5 reoperations in the 12 patients (40%). Two patients needed their continence mechanism replaced. One had renal vein thrombosis with loss of the transplant. The cause for this was unknown but it had been speculated that it could have been caused by graft/body size disproportion. A second kidney was successfully transplanted after 12 months. Two further revisions were required for ureteric kinking and lymphocele. The patient with orthotopic substitution voids to completion. The other patients are continent day and night with easy catheterization.

INTERPRETATION:

This is one of the largest single series reported to date of renal transplantation into continent urinary diversions, and we commend the approach in carefully selected patients, but the difficulties must not be underestimated and the specific problems of intestinal urinary reservoirs have to be reckoned with. These procedures should be confined to centers with considerable experience with this type of surgery and its complications. Lifelong close surveillance is critical for the success of this concept.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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