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Ophthalmology. 2001 Jan;108(1):157-62.

The feasibility of short automated static perimetry in children.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, Texas 79430, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the feasibility of short automated static perimetry using tendency-oriented perimetry in the pediatric population.

DESIGN:

Prospective observational case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifty normal children age 6 through 12 years.

TESTING:

Subjects underwent testing with the Octopus TOP-32 program on the Octopus 1-2-3 automated perimeter. Testing was performed in a typical clinical setting without adaptations to the perimeter, prolonged training, or the use of custom seating. Each eye was tested twice.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Ability to complete automated static perimetry tests with both eyes. Mean sensitivity, mean defect, and loss of variance; gray scale and numeric representations of the field; duration of each test and of the entire session; subjective assessment of each test as normal or abnormal; calculation of test specificity. Comparisons by age and test number were performed.

RESULTS:

All subjects successfully completed all four tests. The mean duration for each test was 2:30+/- 0.23 minutes. The average time for the whole session, including training, testing both eyes twice, and rest periods, was 25.8+/-4.87 minutes. Improvement in the specificity of the test (fewer abnormal tests in normal children) occurred in direct relation to subject age (R = 0.5).

CONCLUSIONS:

Automated static perimetry using short, tendency-oriented programs can be successfully performed in normal children age 6 through 12 years in a typical clinical setting. Age was the best predictor of the mean sensitivity, reproducibility, and accuracy of the test, with the most reliable results obtained after 7 years of age. In children 6 to 7 years old, significant interindividual variability was present, and testing success was more dependent on the child's maturity and ability to concentrate. Short automated perimetry seems to be a promising tool for the evaluation of peripheral vision in pediatric patients.

PMID:
11150282
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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