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Nat Med. 2001 Jan;7(1):53-8.

PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activators induce cholesterol removal from human macrophage foam cells through stimulation of the ABCA1 pathway.

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1
Institut Pasteur and U325 INSERM and Université de Lille 2, Lille, France.

Abstract

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and cellular differentiation. PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma are both expressed in human macrophages where they exert anti-inflammatory effects. The activation of PPAR-alpha may promote foam-cell formation by inducing expression of the macrophage scavenger receptor CD36. This prompted us to investigate the influence of different PPAR-activators on cholesterol metabolism and foam-cell formation of human primary and THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activators do not influence acetylated low density lipoprotein-induced foam-cell formation of human macrophages. In contrast, PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activators induce the expression of the gene encoding ABCA1, a transporter that controls apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. These effects are likely due to enhanced expression of liver-x-receptor alpha, an oxysterol-activated nuclear receptor which induces ABCA1-promoter transcription. Moreover, PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma activators increase apoAI-induced cholesterol efflux from normal macrophages. In contrast, PPAR-alpha or PPAR-gamma activation does not influence cholesterol efflux from macrophages isolated from patients with Tangier disease, which is due to a genetic defect in ABCA1. Here we identify a regulatory role for PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma in the first steps of the reverse-cholesterol-transport pathway through the activation of ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in human macrophages.

PMID:
11135616
DOI:
10.1038/83348
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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