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Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Dec;108(12):1203-7.

Immunologic effects of background exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in Dutch preschool children.

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1
Department of Paediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus University and University Hospital/Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Weisglas@alkg.azr.nl

Abstract

Prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins is associated with changes in the T-cell lymphocyte population in healthy Dutch infants. We investigated whether these changes persist into later childhood and whether background exposure to PCBs and dioxins is associated with the prevalence of infectious or allergic diseases and humoral immunity at preschool age. The total study group consisted of 207 healthy mother-infant pairs. We estimated prenatal exposure to PCBs and dioxins by the sum of PCBs 118, 138, 153, and 180 (sigmaPCB) in maternal and cord plasma and in breast-fed infants by the dioxin, planar, and mono-ortho PCB toxic equivalent (TEQ) levels in human milk. At 42 months of age, current body burden was estimated by the PCB in plasma. We assessed the prevalence of infectious and allergic diseases by parent questionnaire, and measured humoral immunity by antibody levels for mumps, measles, and rubella after primary vaccination. We performed immunologic marker analyses of lymphocytes in a subgroup of 85 children. Prenatal PCB exposure was associated with an increased number of lymphocytes, T-cells, and CD3CD8(+) (cytotoxic), CD4(+)CD45RO(+) (memory), T-cell receptor (TcR) [alpha]ss(+), and CD3(+)HLA-DR(+) (activated) T cells and lower antibody levels to mumps and measles at preschool age. Adjusted for confounders, prenatal PCB exposure was associated with less shortness of breath with wheeze, and current PCB body burden was associated with a higher prevalence of recurrent middle-ear infections and of chicken pox and a lower prevalence of allergic reactions. A higher dioxin TEQ was associated with a higher prevalence of coughing, chest congestion, and phlegm. We conclude that in Dutch preschool children the effects of perinatal background exposure to PCBs and dioxins persist into childhood and might be associated with a greater susceptibility to infectious diseases. Common infections acquired early in life may prevent the development of allergy, so PCB exposure might be associated with a lower prevalence of allergic diseases.

PMID:
11133402
PMCID:
PMC1240203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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