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Lancet. 2000 Dec 9;356(9246):1970-4.

Hypoglycaemic counter-regulation at normal blood glucose concentrations in patients with well controlled type-2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Vascular Medicine and Diabetes Research, School of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Sciences, Exeter, Devon, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intensive treatment to achieve good glycaemic control in diabetic patients is limited by a high frequency of hypoglycaemia. The glucose concentrations at which symptoms and release of counter-regulatory hormones takes place have not been studied in patients with well controlled type-2 diabetes.

METHODS:

We studied seven well controlled, non-insulin treated, type-2 diabetic patients (mean HbA1c [corrected according to Diabetes Control and Complications Trial] 7.4%, SD 1.0) and seven healthy controls matched for age, sex, and body mass index with a stepped hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemic glucose clamp. Symptoms, cognitive function, and counter-regulatory hormone concentrations were measured at each glucose plateau, and the glucose value at which there was a significant change from baseline was calculated.

FINDINGS:

Symptom response took place at higher whole-blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients than in controls. Counter-regulatory release of epinephrine, norepinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol showed a similar pattern--eg, at blood glucose concentrations of 3.8 mmol/L [SD 0.4] vs 2.6 [0.3] for epinephrine.

INTERPRETATION:

Glucose thresholds for counter-regulatory hormone secretion are altered in well controlled type-2 diabetic patients, so that both symptoms and counter-regulatory hormone release can take place at normal glucose values. This effect might protect type-2 diabetic patients against episodes of profound hypoglycaemia and make the achievement of normoglycaemia more challenging in clinical practice.

PMID:
11130525
DOI:
10.1016/s0140-6736(00)03322-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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