Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Care. 2000 Dec;23(12):1725-30.

Long-term renoprotective effect of nisoldipine and lisinopril in type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy.

Author information

1
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark. lise.tarnow@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the long-term effect on kidney function of a long-acting calcium antagonist (nisoldipine) versus a long-acting ACE inhibitor (lisinopril) in hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

We performed a 4-year prospective, randomized, double-dummy controlled study comparing nisoldipine (20-40 mg once a day) with lisinopril (10-20 mg once a day). The study was double-blinded for the first year and single-blinded thereafter. The study included 51 hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. Three patients dropped out during the first month; results for the remaining 48 patients are presented.

RESULTS:

At baseline, the two groups were comparable: glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 85 +/- 5 and 85 +/- 6 ml x min(-1) x [1.73 m](-2); mean 24-h ambulatory blood pressure was 108 +/- 3 and 105 +/- 2 mmHg, and albuminuria was 1,554 mg/24 h (95% CI 980-2,465) and 1,033 mg/24 h (760-1,406) in the lisinopril and nisoldipine groups, respectively. Mean 24-h arterial blood pressure during the study did not differ between the lisinopril and nisoldipine groups (100 +/- 2 and 103 +/- 1 mmHg, respectively). The time-course of albuminuria differed between groups (P < 0.001). Whereas initiation of treatment with lisinopril resulted in a reduction from baseline albuminuria by 52% (95% CI 14-73), albuminuria in the nisoldipine group did not change throughout the study GFR declined in a biphasic manner with an initial (0-6 months) reduction of 1.3 +/- 0.3 ml x min(-1) x month(-1) in the lisinopril group compared with 0.2 +/- 0.4 ml x min(-1) x month(-1) in the nisoldipine group (P < 0.01). The subsequent sustained decline (6 to 48 months or the end of treatment) was identical in the two groups: 0.5 +/- 0.1 ml min(-1) x month(-1) (NS). Two patients in the lisinopril group and three patients in the nisoldipine group entered therapy for end-stage renal failure.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term treatment with lisinopril or nisoldipine has similar beneficial effects on progression of diabetic nephropathy in hypertensive type 1 diabetic patients.

PMID:
11128341
DOI:
10.2337/diacare.23.12.1725
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center