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Mol Psychiatry. 2000 Nov;5(6):654-63, 571.

Reduction in Reelin immunoreactivity in hippocampus of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis 55455, USA. fatem002@tc.umn.edu

Abstract

Accumulation of neurobiological knowledge points to neurodevelopmental origins for certain psychotic and mood disorders. Recent landmark postmortem reports implicate Reelin, a secretory glycoprotein responsible for normal lamination of brain, in the pathology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. We employed quantitative immunocytochemistry to measure levels of Reelin protein in various compartments of hippocampal formation in subjects diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression compared to normal controls. Significant reductions were observed in Reelin-positive adjusted cell densities in the dentate molecular layer (ANOVA, P < 0.001), CA4 area (ANOVA, P < 0.001), total hippocampal area (ANOVA, P < 0.038) and in Reelin-positive cell counts in CA4 (ANOVA, P < 0.042) of schizophrenics vs controls. Adjusted Reelin-positive cell densities were also reduced in CA4 areas of subjects with bipolar disorder (ANOVA, P < 0.001) and nonsignificantly in those with major depression. CA4 areas were also significantly reduced in schizophrenic (ANOVA, P < 0.009) patients. No significant effects of confounding variables were found. The exception was that family history of psychiatric illness correlated strongly with Reelin reductions in several areas of hippocampus (CA4, adjusted cell density, F = 13.77, P = 0.001). We present new immunocytochemical evidence showing reductions in Reelin expression in hippocampus of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression and confirm recent reports documenting a similar deficit involving Reelin expression in brains of subjects with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

PMID:
11126396
DOI:
10.1038/sj.mp.4000783
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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