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J Physiol. 2000 Dec 15;529 Pt 3:723-34.

Zinc-induced changes in ionic currents of clonal rat pancreatic -cells: activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels.

Author information

1
Apsic-Pharmacologie, Centre Medical Universitaire, 1 rue Michel-Servet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland. alain.bloc@medecine.unige.ch

Abstract

The effects of zinc (Zn2+) on excitability and ionic conductances were analysed on RINm5F insulinoma cells under whole-cell and outside-out patch-clamp recording conditions. We found that extracellular application of 10-20 microM Zn2+ induced a reversible abolition of Ca2+ action potential firing, which was accompanied by an hyperpolarisation of the resting membrane potential. Higher concentrations of Zn2+, in the tens to hundreds micromolar range, induced a reversible reduction of voltage-gated Ca2+ and, to a lesser extent, K+ currents. Low-voltage-activated Ca2+ currents were more sensitive to Zn2+ block than high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. The Zn2+-induced hyperpolarisation arose from a dose-dependent increase in a voltage-independent K+ conductance that was pharmacologically identified as an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) conductance. The effect was rapid in onset, readily reversible, voltage independent, and related to intracellular ATP concentration. In the presence of 1 mM intracellular ATP, half-maximal activation of KATP channels was obtained with extracellular application of 1.7 microM Zn2+. Single channel analysis revealed that extracellular Zn2+ increased the KATP channel open-state probability with no change in the single channel conductance. Our data support the hypothesis that Zn2+ binding to KATP protein subunits results in an activation of the channels, therefore regulating the resting membrane potential and decreasing the excitability of RINm5F cells. Taken together, our results suggest that Zn2+ can influence insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells through a negative feedback loop, involving both KATP and voltage-gated conductances.

PMID:
11118501
PMCID:
PMC2270222
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-7793.2000.00723.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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