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J Hum Hypertens. 2000 Dec;14(12):795-8.

The effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in patients with therapy-resistant hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Ostra, Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Afferent nerve stimulation, such as acupuncture and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), has shown a blood pressure reduction in both animal and man. In the present open and non-controlled study we investigated the effect on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure of low frequency TENS in a group of hypertensive subjects who do not respond properly to pharmacological treatment.

METHOD:

Twelve patients were investigated. The patients were treated with TENS at two acupoints on both forearms for 30 min twice daily during 4 weeks. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was recorded 1 week before, at start, at the end and finally 1 week after the TENS treatment.

RESULTS:

The blood pressure did not change significantly during the run-in period. After 4 weeks of TENS, the mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 6.3 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and the mean diastolic blood pressure decreased by 3.7 mm Hg (P < 0.05). The blood pressure reduction remained unchanged 1 week after treatment. There was no change in mean heart rate.

CONCLUSION:

The present study suggests that continuous TENS may have additional blood pressure-lowering properties in hypertensive patients who do not respond properly to pharmacological treatment. The effect of TENS may also have a prolonged effect. Journal of Human Hypertension (2000) 14, 795-798

PMID:
11114695
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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