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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000 Dec;162(6):2039-42.

Fibrinogen levels and obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ruhrlandklinik, University of Essen, Germany. TE_MC_Wessendorf@compuserve.com

Abstract

The plasma level of fibrinogen is felt to be an independent risk factor for vascular events. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has a high prevalence in patients with stroke and may also be an independent risk factor. The aim of our study was to determine the association between OSA and plasma levels of fibrinogen in patients with stroke. Polysomnography was performed during neurological rehabilitation in 113 patients (82 men, 31 women, age 58 +/- 11.1 yr, mean +/- SD) with ischemic stroke. OSA was absent (RDI < 5) in 44 patients, 42 had mild OSA (5 < or = RDI < 20), and 27 had moderate to severe OSA (RDI > or = 20). Parameters of OSA (respiratory disturbance index [RDI], oxygen indices) were correlated to plasma levels of fibrinogen, measured in the morning after admission to rehabilitation. Fibrinogen was positively correlated with RDI (r = 0.24, p = 0.007), duration of the longest apnea (r = 0.18, p = 0.049), and negatively correlated with several oxygen indices including average minimal oxygen saturation (r = -0.41, p < 0.001). Correlation coefficients were slightly higher when excluding patients with stroke of presumed cardiac origin. Multiple linear regression identified minimal mean oxygen saturation and sex as independent predictors of fibrinogen level. The correlation between severity of coexisting OSA and fibrinogen level in patients with stroke suggests a possible pathophysiological mechanism for an increased risk of stroke in patients with OSA.

PMID:
11112110
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.162.6.2001048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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