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Optom Vis Sci. 2000 Oct;77(10):503-10.

An in vivo comparison of the kinetics of protein and lipid deposition on group II and group IV frequent-replacement contact lenses.

Author information

1
Biomaterials Research Unit, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom. lwjones@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the degree and rate of deposition of protein and lipid on FDA group II and group IV contact lens materials over a period of up to 28 days of wear.

METHODS:

Twenty-two subjects wore a group IV lens (Acuvue) and a group II lens (Soflens 66) in a randomized, cross-over study. The lenses were randomly worn for periods between 1 and 28 days and then collected for laboratory-based deposition analysis.

RESULTS:

The group II lenses revealed an increased degree of lipoidal spoilage (p < 0.0001) and the group IV lenses exhibited increased protein spoilage (p < 0.0001). Surface protein for both materials reached a maximum after 1 day and did not increase over the 4-week wearing period (p = NS). Total protein for group IV lenses reached a maximum between 1 and 7 days and then reached a plateau, with no further increase occurring (p = NS), whereas total protein accumulation on the group II lens continued to increase across all time periods (p < 0.05). Lipid deposition on the group IV lens was maximal after 1 day and increased no further (p = NS), whereas lipid deposition on the group II material monotonously increased and progressively built-up over the 4 weeks of wear (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The kinetics of contact lens deposition is mediated by the chemical structure of the contact lens material under consideration. Protein deposition occurs rapidly with group IV materials before reaching a maximum, whereas N-vinyl pyrrolidone-containing group II materials progressively accumulate protein and lipid deposits, with no plateau occurring.

PMID:
11100888
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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