Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microbes Infect. 2000 Oct;2(12):1431-4.

Detection of serum antibodies to Bartonella henselae and Coxiella burnetii from Japanese children and pregnant women.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, S.1 W.16 Chuo-ku, Hokkaido, 060-8543, Sapporo, Japan. numazaki@sapmed.ac.jp

Abstract

The participation of Bartonella henselae and Coxiella burnetii in the pathogenesis of fever of unknown origin (FUO) and lymphadenopathy has not been completely clarified. Prevalence of these two agents in Japanese children is also unknown. Serum IgG and IgM antibodies to B. henselae and to C. burnetii were examined by the indirect fluorescence antibody assay. Enzyme immunoassay kits were used to detect serum IgG and IgA antibodies against Chlamydia trachomatis. Out of 200 healthy normal pregnant women, two (1.0%) had serum IgG antibodies to B. henselae, four (2.0%) to C. burnetii and 49 (24.5%) to C. trachomatis. Out of 29 patients with FUO, one (3.4%) had serum IgG antibodies to B. henselae, four (13.8%) to C. burnetii and none to C. trachomatis. Out of 31 patients with cervical lymphadenopathy, three (9.6%) had serum IgG antibodies to B. henselae, two (6.5%) to C. burnetii and none to C. trachomatis. Out of 22 patients with generalized lymphadenopathy, one (4.5%) had serum IgG antibodies to B. henselae, three (13.6%) to C. burnetii and none to C. trachomatis. Prevalences of serum antibodies to C. burnetii in the patients with FUO and generalized lymphadenopathy and to B. henselae in the patients with cervical lymphadenopathy were significantly higher than those of normal pregnant women (Welch's t-test; P<0.01). These two agents may have some roles in the pathogenesis of FUO and lymphadenopathy in Japanese children.

PMID:
11099929
DOI:
10.1016/s1286-4579(00)01297-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center