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Neuroscience. 2000;100(3):475-84.

Differential regulation of H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA subunits, ferritin protein and iron following focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroscience Research, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

Iron may catalyse the production of reactive oxygen species during post-ischemic reoxygenation and subsequently lead to brain damage. Ferritin, an iron sequestering and storage protein, can also be a source of iron after ischemic insult. However, its role in ischemia-reperfusion has not been carefully investigated. In the present study, we examined the temporal and spatial induction profiles of both H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA and protein in a well-defined focal cerebral ischemia model. Results of northern blot analysis showed a delayed and prolonged induction of both H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA in the ischemic cortex of rats subjected to 60min ischemic insult. A significant induction of both H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA was observed at 12h and remained elevated for up to 336h after the onset of reperfusion. At the peak level, quantitative analysis of the blot indicated a 2.5-fold and a six-fold increase in H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA, respectively, compared with the sham-operated controls. No apparent change in the levels of either messenger RNA was observed in the contralateral side. Results of in situ hybridization studies revealed constitutive expression of both H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA throughout the brain in sham-operated animals, in particular the hippocampus and the piriform cortex. Nevertheless, the signal intensity of H-ferritin messenger RNA was much higher than that of L-ferritin messenger RNA. Seventy-two hours after 60min ischemia, marked expression of H-ferritin messenger RNA was observed in the area surrounding the middle cerebral artery irrigated cortex, the medial part of the caudoputamen and in the subfield of the CA1 hippocampal region of the ipsilateral hemisphere. Similarly, a large induction of L-ferritin messenger RNA was also noted in several areas, including the middle cerebral artery irrigated cortex, the lateral part of the caudoputamen and the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 hippocampal region, which were totally different from areas where H-ferritin messenger RNA was found. At 336h after ischemia, increased expression of H-ferritin messenger RNA was observed in the peri-necrosis and ipsilateral thalamus regions, while L-ferritin messenger RNA was noted exclusively at the edge within the necrosis. Results of immunohistochemical study further revealed that ferritin immunoreactivity was present in the same areas where increased ferritin messenger RNA was found. Sixty-minute ischemia also led to iron deposition in discrete areas. Iron deposition was highly associated with the induction of ferritin, particularly in the macrophage- and microglia-positive areas where cell death or tissue necrosis was noted.In summary, our initial findings indicate that ischemic insult leads to induction of both H- and L-ferritin messenger RNA. In the present study, although the temporal induction profiles were similar, the major expression areas for these two genes were totally different. Ferritin immunoreactivity was observed in the same areas where increased ferritin messenger RNA was found. Ischemia also resulted in iron deposition, which highly associated with the ferritin immunoreactivity. The exact regulatory mechanism and pathological significance for the differential expression of H- and L-ferritin genes following ischemia/reperfusion remain to be clarified.

PMID:
11098110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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