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Ann Thorac Surg. 2000 Nov;70(5):1483-8; discussion 1488-9.

Coarctation of the aorta in adults: surgical results and long-term follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Rouen University Hospital Charles Nicolle, France. francois.bouchart@chu-rouen.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of coarctation surgical repair on arterial blood pressure in adults more than 20 years of age.

METHODS:

Thirty-five adults (23 men), mean age 28.1 +/- 5.7 years (range, 21 to 52 years), underwent coarctation surgical repair between 1977 and 1997. All patients had preoperative hypertension. Mean systolic blood pressure was 178 +/- 37 mm Hg (range, 110 to 230 mm Hg). Thirty-three patients were taking at least one hypertension medication at the time of operation. All patients had preoperative catheterization and angiography (mean gradient across the coarctation was 62 +/- 27 mm Hg [range, 32 to 130 mm Hg]). Operative technique was resection and end-to-end anastomosis for 30 patients, resection with Dacron (C. R. Bard, Haverhill, MA) graft for 4 patients, and a prosthetic bypass graft for 1 patient. There were no hospital deaths and no late morbidity.

RESULTS:

All patients were reviewed. Follow-up was 165 +/- 56 months (range, 25 to 240 months). Of the 35 patients with preoperative hypertension, 23 were normotensive (systolic blood pressure < or = 140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure < or = 90 mm Hg) with no medication. Twelve patients were receiving medication: 6 required single-drug therapy and 6 patients required two drugs. Exercise testing was performed at an average of 6 +/- 4 months after repair and revealed hypertensive response to exercise in 8 of the 23 patients who were normotensive at rest and without medication. There were no recoarctation or repeat operations. Six aortic valve diseases were observed: three aortic incompetences (two bicuspid valves) treated by two valve replacements and one Bentall procedure, and three aortic stenoses (two valve replacements). No patient had evidence of a cerebrovascular accident.

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgical repair of coarctation in adults has proved to be an effective procedure and significantly reduces arterial hypertension. However, long-term surveillance is mandatory and should include exercise testing to identify patients with potential hypertension.

PMID:
11093474
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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