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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2000 Dec 5;97(25):13625-30.

Postnatal human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
Craniofacial and Skeletal Diseases Branch, National Institute on Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Abstract

Dentinal repair in the postnatal organism occurs through the activity of specialized cells, odontoblasts, that are thought to be maintained by an as yet undefined precursor population associated with pulp tissue. In this study, we isolated a clonogenic, rapidly proliferative population of cells from adult human dental pulp. These DPSCs were then compared with human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), known precursors of osteoblasts. Although they share a similar immunophenotype in vitro, functional studies showed that DPSCs produced only sporadic, but densely calcified nodules, and did not form adipocytes, whereas BMSCs routinely calcified throughout the adherent cell layer with clusters of lipid-laden adipocytes. When DPSCs were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, they generated a dentin-like structure lined with human odontoblast-like cells that surrounded a pulp-like interstitial tissue. In contrast, BMSCs formed lamellar bone containing osteocytes and surface-lining osteoblasts, surrounding a fibrous vascular tissue with active hematopoiesis and adipocytes. This study isolates postnatal human DPSCs that have the ability to form a dentin/pulp-like complex.

PMID:
11087820
PMCID:
PMC17626
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.240309797
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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