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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2000 Nov;183(5):1296-300.

Effects of a policy of elective cesarean delivery in cases of suspected fetal macrosomia on the incidence of brachial plexus injury and the rate of cesarean delivery.

Author information

1
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bnai Zion Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Technion.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a policy of elective cesarean delivery for suspected fetal macrosomia on the incidence of brachial palsy and on the cesarean delivery rate.

STUDY DESIGN:

We performed a retrospective assessment of a policy that recommends cesarean delivery for macrosomia (fetal weight > or =4500 g). Fetal weight was estimated by palpation, and ultrasonographic weight estimation was carried out whenever macrosomia was suspected.

RESULTS:

During the 4 years of the study 16,416 deliveries resulted in 133 infants with macrosomia (0.8%). Macrosomia was suspected in 47 cases and confirmed by birth weight in 21 (45%). Antenatal estimation of fetal weight was carried out for 115 of the fetuses with macrosomia (86%). Macrosomia was correctly predicted in 21 of 115 cases (18.3%). Thirteen infants with undiagnosed macrosomia were delivered by emergency cesarean procedures, and 99 were delivered vaginally. Three infants with macrosomia (3%) and 14 infants without macrosomia (0.1%) sustained brachial plexus injury. Our policy prevented at most a single case of brachial palsy, and it contributed 0.16% to our cesarean delivery rate.

CONCLUSIONS:

A policy of elective cesarean delivery in cases of suspected fetal macrosomia had an insignificant effect on the incidence of brachial plexus injury. Its contribution to the rate of cesarean delivery was also small.

PMID:
11084580
DOI:
10.1067/mob.2000.107382
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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